The themes of transformation, seduction/repulsion as well as notions of desire/consumption were central in my mind when continuing my experiments with blown sugar.

 

I was aware that when placed in their mosquito net 'pocket' my blown sugar vessels had an apparently stable form, whereas to handle they were rather fragile. Especially while holding sugar syrup, despite their mass they had an instability and vulnerability.

 

I chose a mosquito net as a support for the sugar forms as the purpose of the net is to catch parasites. It was while considering sugar as a parasite I started experimenting with this materisl. I wanted to allude to the opposite of something that nourishes and feeds.

 

The sugar spheres, suspended in the mosquito net, dropped mainly on their sides, suggesting organic forms such as breasts or stomachs when filled with liquid. As they floated on their sides they moved towards a state of decomposition. The sugar syrup makes a sound as it drips to the floor and leaves a visual trace. The sense of transformation in the piece is dominant.

 

The addition of the sugar syrup was influenced in part by Janet Hodgeson 's work White Cube, Black Square in which a wriggling worm of molasses drips from a height. It also accelerated the degeneration of the blown sugar.

 

The location for this work was an unused hen house. It was chosen initially for practical reasons: I could work from height and be messy. I did enjoy the fact that the blown sugar had a passing resemblance to huge eggs. In the future, it would be interesting to explore how the work would change in the context of an urban settings or other settings.

 

As sugar is a processed foodstuff, it could be seen to be in a process of digestion. It could be suggested this mass produced substance is a form of pollution to the stomach and body.

 

I think this has been the most successful so far of my experiments with sugar, in terms of communicating ideas around transformation, seduction and repulsion. I like the idea of relatively simple transformations of materials or shifts in context opening up new possibilities.

 

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